Doxology is the Fruit of Theology

Don’t let the title of today’s message fool you into thinking that I wrote this for the students at Knox Seminary; I wrote it for you!  Once we get a handle on the two “big” words, you’ll see just how simple and practical this message is for all of us.

Doxology is derived from two Greek words: doxa, meaning “praise,” and logos, meaning “word.”  Doxology is an expression of our love and thanksgiving for God as a response to His mercy, love, and grace toward us, poured out through His beloved Son.  Theology is the field of study of God, His attributes, and how He relates to the world around us.

Based on these definitions, can you see how doxology is the fruit of theology?  What you believe about God (theology) determines, to a much greater extent than you might think, your response (doxology) back to Him.

If you believe your acceptance by God is based on your working for God, then you will praise Him on your good days and dread Him on your bad days.  Far too many Christians have a watered-down doxology because they have accepted a watered-down version of the Gospel.  They are plagued by faulty theology, which posits that their working for God proves their worth to God.

Nothing could be further from the truth!  Christianity is not about doing; it is about being who you are because of what Jesus has already done for you.  It is living out practically what you are positionally, because of the finished work of Jesus.  

Christians are called to be a doxological people—living out of the truths of the Gospel with a heart that is overflowing with gratitude and thanksgiving for all that Jesus has accomplished.  In Christ, God reached down to us because we couldn’t reach up to Him.  Jesus willingly entered into this world, lived a sinless life, died a sacrificial death, rose from the grave on the third day, and ascended into heaven . . . from whence He will come again to judge the living and the dead.  He chose suffering so we could be comforted.  He chose injustice that we would be justified.  He chose to be forsaken so we would be forgiven.  He chose death so we would have life everlasting.  And He did all this while were still sinners (Romans 3:23) . . . while we hated Him! 

This is the Gospel, to which the cross is central.  Jesus nailed every one of our sins—past, present, and future to that dirty tree.  He did for us what we could never do for ourselves.  This means that God is no longer our Judge.  He is our Abba Father, who loves us unconditionally.  It is with these truths in mind that we live a life marked by overwhelming gratitude and continual thanksgiving.  It is in view of God’s mercy to us in Christ (Romans 12:1) that we sing His praises both day and night.  This is the fuel that ignites the fire of our faith, whether we are in sickness or in health, in plenty or in want.  Praise God from whom all blessings flow!

One of the contemporary praise writers, Billy James Foote crystallized this idea of solid theology producing heartfelt doxology with his lovely anthem, “You are My King (Amazing Love).”

I’m forgiven because You were forsaken
I’m accepted, You were condemned
I’m alive and well, Your Spirit is within me
Because You died and rose again


Amazing love, how can it be
That You, my King, should die for me?
Amazing love, I know it’s true
It’s my joy to honor You
In all I do, to honor You

This is the Gospel.  This is grace for your race.  NEVER FORGET THAT . . . AMEN! 

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